All posts by Pat Gustafson

An Invitation To “Aaron Power”

MONDAY, May 21, 2018, 7:00 pm (Activity Center)

DON’T MISS THIS NEW FUN MUSICAL READING-RECITAL

WITH DAN HAUGHEY & MICHAEL CALLAHAN

AARON POWER is an exciting, new, full-length musical about a talented but troubled Anglo-Navajo teen!  <!–split–>  Aaron is sent by a medicine man on an epic quest to Ireland to escape a possible crime. The teen is to discover the mystery of his Irish roots. A gifted musician, Aaron Power Thorn meets up with a cutting-edge Celtic Rock band that is running from the suspicion that one of its members may have committed an act of terrorism in Belfast. Aaron is quickly assimilated into the band, its culture and its Irish tour–a journey for its own musical identity. Aaron falls in love with the lead singer, Kate, who helps him find his place in Irish music, traditions, and the discovery of his haunting heritage: that Aaron’s mysterious and late grandfather was a “Taoiseach” (pronounced teé-sheck): one of Ireland’s most loved yet hated political chiefs of modern times. With the pressures of a new culture and challenges of relationships converging on him, Aaron—in a flurry of emotions– flees to the Great Blasket Island, the apparent burial ground of his grandfather. Aaron aims to resort to violence, to “blow up” and deface the controversial, ill-fated family legacy that is now his own. In his struggle, he slips on a rock during a terrible island storm, and falls unconscious into a dream-like, nightmarish state. He is confronted in a dream sequence by an apparition of his infamous grandfather, Charles Power, as he confronts Aaron with his Irish identity, family and troubled values, and even the meaning of love. Aaron is rescued, and in the denouement, begins a healing process as he reconciles issues that have haunted him. He pledges a new-found understanding of his heritage, his love of family, and his love for Kate. He sees himself now as a man and a musician with a meaningful message, who has much to express about the world and who he really is. He vows to return to the States with Kate, reunite with his Navajo family, and resolve his tempestuous life. This is a musical of cultural discovery, family fusion, and a quest for peace. It is a right-of-passage story about personal challenge and growth, set to distinctive, uplifting sounds of contemporary Irish American and Native American music.

May Fellowship Luncheon

Thursday, May 24th at Noon in the Activity Center

The menu will be:  “Breakfast for Lunch” – Including Breakfast Casserole, Fruit Cup, Made-From-Scratch-Biscuits With Sausage Gravy!   Please RSVP to Steve and Mary Ann Harvey at 786-2062.

Nurse’s Notes: Take Changes in Stride – 6 Tips for Healthy Transitions

Periods of transition or significant change in your life, whether the death of a loved one, a loss of a job, a divorce, or adjusting to an empty nest, can take a toll on physical, mental and spiritual health.  It’s important to take changes in stride and do your best to keep your health and attitude up even when you feel down.  Here are some tips for coping with change. <!–split–>

ACCEPTANCE   The first step for coping with any change is to fully accept it.  Many times it is already out of your control, so accept that fact, and move forward.

POSITIVITY   Try to visualize the positive aspects of the change.  Transitions happen for a reason, and many times change challenges us in ways that may make us uncomfortable but can strengthen us if we let it.

HONESTY   Take time to honest with yourself and reflect on your emotions but do not let them control you.

GOOD VIBES   Do your best to surround yourself with people who want the best for you and can help feed your positivity and boost your self-esteem.  Being around others with optimistic attitudes can greatly influence your own.

VULNERABILITY   Let yourself be vulnerable and ask for help when you need it.  Realize that you’re not the only one who has faced these obstacles, and seek out those who have had similar experiences and come out on top.

LETTING GO   The most important step of accepting and embracing change is to let go of the past.  Letting go does not mean banishing it or forgetting it ever existed, but make a conscious effort to let the past be the past.  The future is always unfolding, and dwelling on the past does little to help ride that wave.  Keep yourself present in the present!

Lastly, ALLOW YOURSELF TIME   Transitions take time to adjust to and everyone I different and needs a different amount of time.  Don’t worry that you aren’t transitioning properly because it is taking you a different amount of time than it took someone else.  Everyone is different.

— taken from “Church Health”

 Your Parish Nurse,  Kara

From the desk of Pastor Stan – The Lord Is My Shepherd, PSALM 23

I wanted to share this message with you because I think it’s a reminder of why we are so important to God. It also reminds me that I, we are also the apple of God’s eye. I pray that the messages that I preach are always thought provoking and uplifting. Be encouraged! Pastor Stan

SUMMARY

If we would be so bold as to make the claim, the LORD, the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, the Creator of the Universe, is our shepherd, we first need to relinquish our claims of self-sufficiency and acknowledge our need of a shepherd. <!–split–>

 What more can be said about the 23rd Psalm? How many of us were — thankfully — required to memorize it when we were yet barely able to read? How often have we heard it? How often have we recited it? How often have we thrown it up unto the Lord our God, frantically, as our own personal cry of the heart, when (and only when) it seemed as if all else had failed and we could not see the way before us?

Really, what promises this psalm puts forward! It is good for us to return to it often, savoring, pondering each line, rather than thoughtlessly repeating it as an exercise we have been required to commit to memory. Returning to it, even as adults, brings much in the way of rewards. Why has this psalm been commended to legions of youth over the centuries of the church’s life? Simply because it promises so much.

“The LORD is my shepherd, I shall not want ….” This is quite a claim, after all! Who would dare make such a bold statement, a claim bordering on spiritual pride, even arrogance — the LORD, God, the Creator of the Universe, the God of the Exodus, is my shepherd; mine! Who is speaking, here? David? Jesus? Israel? Me? Us? Who could make such a claim?

The Shepherd Of Israel

Israel could, to be sure. The LORD was indeed Israel’s shepherd, as Israel made its collective way out of Egypt, out of slavery, and onto the land promised to them forever, with the LORD, yes, shepherding them with mighty acts of salvation. When Israel was in the wilderness, Israel “wanted” nothing; Israel lacked nothing. The LORD provided what Israel needed: manna for food, water out of a rock, leadership from Moses, correction when straying off to golden calves and to political rebellion. The clothes on their backs did not wear out; the sandals on their feet did not rot away. Surely God shepherded Israel; God provided for Israel as a shepherd provides for sheep.

Even before that time in the wilderness, when Israel was helpless in the iron grip of an oppressor requiring them, literally, to make bricks without straw even then, God was Israel’s shepherd. The Israelites, ground down, could do nothing for themselves. God raised up Moses to lead them out from under Pharaoh’s heel — indeed, even before Moses was born, God was Moses’ shepherd. Moses, born of an unnamed Levite man and an unnamed Levite woman, was shielded from Pharaoh’s grip by the faith and the resourcefulness of his sister Miriam. And Moses, tending his flock in Midian after being driven from Egypt by faithless and ungrateful Israelites, was shepherded, against his own stubborn will, back to Egypt by a Voice calling from a burning bush.

Moses, himself shepherded by God, shepherded Israel out of Egypt. Then, during that time in the wilderness, when the Israelites could do nothing for themselves except complain, God provided food from heaven; God provided water from bare rock. God provided. God was Moses’ shepherd; God was Israel’s shepherd.

                                                        — to be continued in the June “Chimes”

2018 Summer Church Camp

Check out the Camp Guides for 2018. Pick up a brochure outside the office on the wall display.

** Early bird discount if you register and pay in full by April 16, 2018.

** Sibling discount & Bring-a-friend discount.

** Camper scholarships are available.

** Lower Wisconsin River Canoe Trip 7/21 – 7/28

** Hammock Camp

** Sports Camp

** Family Camp