All posts by Pat Gustafson

Fellowship Luncheon

Thursday, August 23 – Noon – Activity Center

MENU:

We will be celebrating our Swedish heritage with a mini Swedish smorgasbord – including meatballs, potato sausage, rice pudding and more!

RSVP to Steve & Mary Ann Harvey at 786-2062.

Nurse’s Notes — August Is Back To School Month

T’was the night before school started,

When all through the town,

The parents were cheering.

It was a riotous sound!

By eight, kids were washed

And tucked into bed…

When memories of homework…filled them with dread!

New pencils, new folders, new notebooks, too!

New teachers, new friends…their anxiety grew!

The parents just giggled when they learned of this fright

And shouted upstairs-…

GO TO BED-IT’S A SCHOOL NIGHT!     Author unknown

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When most adults think about exercise, they imagine working out in the gym, running on a treadmill, or lifting weights.

But for kids, exercise means playing and being physically active. Kids exercise when they have gym class at school, during recess, at dance class or soccer practice, while riding bikes, or when playing tag.

The Many Benefits of Exercise

Everyone can benefit from regular exercise. Kids who are active will:

Besides enjoying the health benefits of regular exercise, kids who are physically fit sleep better. They’re also better able to handle physical and emotional challenges — from running to catch a bus to studying for a test.

The Three Elements of Fitness

If you’ve ever watched kids on a playground, you’ve seen the three elements of fitness in action when they:

  1. run away from the kid who’s “it” (endurance)
  2. cross the monkey bars (strength)
  3. bend down to tie their shoes (flexibility)

Parents should encourage their kids to do a variety of activities so that they can work on all three elements.

http://kidshealth.org/en/parents/exercise.html?WT.ac=p-ra#catstaying-fit

From The Desk Of Pastor Stan

This article is from the United Methodist “Good News” publication. 

I wanted to share it with you . . .

 “Outwitted by God” by James V. Heidinger II

Maxie Dunnam was reluctant to write God Outwitted Me: The Stories of my Life (Seedbed).  He feared it might appear self-serving.  And after all, he had already written some 40 books and felt that he had told the stories about his life as he was  living it.  While he was urged by many to write such a work, we are deeply indebted to his wife, Jerry, for the nudge that was “the final straw that pushed me over the edge.”  She urged him to write it if for “no other reason, for our children and grandchildren.” <!–split–>

As I write these words, I find myself wanting to thank Jerry repeatedly for that nudge.  I also thank J.D. Walt and the Seedbed team for publishing this rich, relevant, and deeply moving memoir.  The word memoir, rather than autobiography, is Maxie’s choice.  “I’m reminiscing and reflecting,” he writes.  “Some may even say I’m ‘preaching and teaching’ about my experiences.”  These are, indeed, the stories of his life, and Methodists around the world will be deeply moved, instructed, and blessed by them.  Bishops would do well to recommend it to their pastors.

Maxie Dunnam was born in deeply rural Mississippi in 1934, when the country was still feeling the seismic effects of the Great Depression.  He knew poverty and deprivation and paints vivid word pictures of the bleakness of his childhood years.  His home had no electricity or plumbing, and a pathway led down to the outdoor toilet with its memorable, pungent odors.  He recalls the 200-yard trek the family made to get water from a spring.

It was from this humble, backwoods setting that Maxie Dunnam, at age 13, responded to the Gospel he heard preached by Brother Wiley Grissom at Eastside Baptist Church.  As he went forward, his father was right behind him to profess faith in Christ.  The next Sunday, they both were baptized at nearby Thompson Creek.  I admired Maxie’s telling of Brother Grissom’s influence on his life.  Though the Baptist preacher had only a 5th grade education, Maxie showed no condescension toward the uneducated Baptist preacher who had brought him to Christ.  Maxie noted that later, while president of Asbury Theological Seminary, he often thought of Brother Grissom.  “Memory of him kept me aware of the fact that calling and anointing are as important (ultimately, maybe more important) as education.”

From this rural Mississippi setting, came a humble young man who became an effective Methodist minister, served churches faithfully, became the World Editor of the Upper Room devotional, and while there founded the church’s Walk to Emmaus program and helped launch the Academy for Spiritual Formation.  He became a leader in the World Methodist Council, served as senior pastor of Christ United Methodist Church in Memphis, Tennessee, and then in 1994 was elected President of Asbury Theological Seminary in Wilmore, Kentucky.  After serving as seminary president for 10 years, Maxie, along with his wife, Jerry, returned to Christ UM Church in Memphis where he serves today on the staff as minister-at-large along with senior pastor Shane Stanford.  What an extraordinary journey! One senses in this compelling work the pivotal role that prayer has played in Maxie’s ministry, as well as the impressive reality of how Maxie and Jerry were always a team doing ministry together.

In fact, Jerry was a working partner with Maxie in the World Methodist Council.  At the 1991 World Conference in Nairobi, Kenya, Jerry envisioned each national church being asked to create in advance an artistic representation of their church in the year prior to coming to the ‘91 Conference.  In the words of Dr. Joe Hale, the late general secretary of the World Methodist Council, “The overall result was a spectacular array of color, coordinated style, and …an international artistry that was stunning.”  One day of the conference, these banners were carried “through the streets of the city in a great procession.”  Jerry’s wonderful vision of artistry has been a part of every world conference since.

Readers walk with Maxie through the incredible racial violence that existed in Mississippi in 1963.  While he was pastoring there, Medgar Evers was assassinated in Jackson.  The civil rights leader had been helping in James Meredith’s efforts to enroll in the University of Mississippi.  The whole nation was seething with emotion and anger.  Maxie was one of twenty-eight Methodist ministers in the Mississippi Annual Conference who gathered to present a statement.  “Born of Conviction,” to the church in Mississippi.  The statement shook Methodism to its foundations as it got wide media coverage in the state.

One feels the emotion as one of Maxie’s most active members, a doctor who had delivered both of their daughters, “stormed into my office, threw a copy of the Times-Picayune (a New Orleans newspaper) down on the desk and shouted, “What the hell is this?  I have never been so disappointed in my life!”  Maxie’s handling of this encounter is a beautiful example of how Christ was forming his mind and character in the early years of his ministry.

Maxie recalls that, “Within 18 months of the signing of the document, 18 of the 28 signers had left Mississippi, two left later, and only 8 continued their total ministry vocation in the state.” In June of 2013, on the 50th anniversary of Evers’ death, the Mississippi Annual Conference was meeting in Jackson.  The conference presented the The Emma Elzy Award, and award celebrating those who had contributed to the improvement of race relations in Mississippi, to “the 28 ministers.”  Eight of the 28 signers who were still living were present.  Maxie was invited and was there along with Keith Tonkel to    accept the award for “the 28.”  Maxie said in his acceptance remarks, “Fifty years ago some young men, now old men, signed a statement, and now this Annual Conference is saying, ‘We appreciate that.’ God outwits us.” (For a complete article about the statement and its impact, see “The Long Arc Toward Justice” by Steve Beard, Good News, July/August, 2013.)

Maxie is know and loved by Methodists around the world probably more than any living United Methodist leader.  They will be blessed and edified by his book.  Here is a pastor who has been effective in the local church, bold in addressing issues facing the nation, a visionary leader at the Upper Room, a prolific author, a seminary president, a voice for renewal (the Houston and Memphis Declarations, and a co-founder of the Confessing Movement), and a mentor to more pastors than we might imagine.

Maxie believes his most significant contribution to the cause of Christianity and the Christian Church was The Workbook of Living Prayer.  It was first published in 1974 and is still in print.  The publisher estimates that more than one million copies have been printed, and it is available in at least six different languages.  These numbers are utterly stunning! Maxie reports having received “thousands of letters from people who have used it” and many have testified “that their lives were transformed, and many others mark their commitment to full-time Christian ministry to the use of the workbook.”

This is a story that needed to be told.  It is a book that needs to be read.  For those who read it, they will find it far more rewarding than they might have imagined.

In the foreword to the book, the Rev. J.D. Walt, Seedbed’s Publisher, tells of having the task of introducing Maxie to a large group of folks gathered for a weekend of preaching and teaching.  He struggled as he stood before the group and asked, “How does one introduce a hero?”  With those words, he broke down and began to weep.  He could only motion for Maxie to come to the stage, and he sat down.  I think I understand.  Maxie has been a great Christian leader of our day, is a man of genuine humility, of Christlikeness, of impeccable integrity, of seasoned wisdom, and a leader grounded in biblical truth and prayer.  J.D., you are right.  He is worthy of being our “hero.”  May the Lord give us more like him.

Family Fun Movie Night – August 17th at 8:30 pm in Bethel Wesley Parking Lot

Round up your kids, grandkids, friends & neighbors for a fun-filled outdoor movie night.  It will be like going to a drive–in movie only free.  There will be popcorn and pop available.  Bring your own chairs, blankets or sleeping bags to relax on during the movie.  “Trailer Made” is the movie that will be shown.  It is about a father and a young son going on an adventure to Africa in the father’s attempt to reconnect with his son.  After they land in Africa, they lose their luggage and their passports.  Come and see what happens to them!  The fun begins at 8:30!

Backpack And Supply Collection

This year the Education Committee will be putting together backpacks to give to children/schools in need during the school year. We are also gathering supplies for the Learning Center.  Our goal is 20 backpacks that we can bless on August 19.  In order to do this, we will need supplies. <!–split–>

The items being collected are based on the Moline schools supply list.  As you can see, they are requesting brands of items.  The items can be brought to the office.  If you know of someone in need of a backpack, contact the office.  If you have questions, give Chris Baumann a call 309-799-7320. Thanks for your help.

Here are the items needed:

  • Money
  • Elmer’s glue sticks
  • Bottles of glue
  • Dry erase markers (expo)
  • 24 count Crayola crayons
  • 64 count Crayola crayons
  • Crayola washable markers
  • Colored pencils
  • Big pink erasers
  • Fiskar scissors,
  • #2 Ticonderoga pencils
  • Pens, (blue, black, red)
  • Black Sharpie marker
  • Wide rule spiral notebooks
  • Headphones
  • Yellow highlighter
  • 12 inch ruler
  • Pencil sharpener
  • Loose leaf paper
  • 2 pocket folders (plastic)
  • 2 pocket folders (paper)
  • Disinfecting wipes
  • Clorox wipes
  • Quart Ziploc bags
  • Gallon Ziploc bags
  • Kleenex
  • Paper towels.

LEARNING CENTER: stickers, card stock papers, glue sticks, washable markers, colored pencils, and colored daubers.

New Pictorial Church Directory

Universal Church Directories will be here August 7 & 8  to photograph church members for a new pictorial directory.  Everyone who is photographed by Universal will receive a complimentary 8 x 10 portrait and a directory.  <!–split–>

To sign up, use one of the following methods:

  • Go online go to www.ucdir.com and type code IL116 with password BWM18 (lower-case letters must be used).
  • Or, Roxi Batten will be sitting outside the sanctuary before church to help you select a time slot for your photograph. Photographers will be here 2:00 to 8:30 pm both days.

From The Desk Of Pastor Stan

The past year has been one of the most enjoyable years of my 40 years of Ministry. Since becoming the Pastor here at Bethel Wesley, I have been blessed to shepherd some of the most wonderful people in Methodism. The warmth and acceptance has made it easy for me to adjust in so many ways. I thank all of you and I am constantly praying for each of you to grow spiritually and continue to be the loving and caring congregation that you are. <!–split–>

As we embark upon a new conference year, let’s all continue to support the programs, ministries and outreach efforts that Bethel Wesley is currently engaged in. I am excited to see which direction God is going to take us this year.

I’m reminded of the Apostle Paul’s letter of encouragement to the church at Philippi. Paul’s advice to his friends at Philippi, I believe, proves uniquely relevant for us today. Strange events are taking place in the world. A temptation exists for Christians to panic on one hand or go off on a tangent on the other hand. Some people even claim to have a key to future events and capitalize on their so-called knowledge by exploiting gullible people who follow them blindly. Yet, there are others who have become frustrated with the seeming hopelessness of the world and the condition that it is in. There are also those who have become emotionally incapable of normal Christian living and service.

What will wise Christians do? May I suggest that we follow Paul’s simple yet profound advice to the Christians at Philippi?  Whether God is about to wrap up history or not, we should serve him faithfully now. If God is ready to take us to heaven, we should be ready to go. If, however God wants us to continue to live in this perplexed world, we need to be steadfast, unmovable, always abounding in the work of the Lord. Why, of one thing we can be certain – our work, no matter how small it may seem, will not be useless nor fruitless if we are serving our Savior!

Ice Cream Social

The United Methodist Women (UMW) of Bethel Wesley  will be dishing up ice cream and goodies – Come and enjoy!

Sunday, 24 June – 4:30 – 6:30 pm – Activity Center

Tickets Available At The Door

Adults $3.   Children (10 & under) $2.  Price includes pie or cake, ice cream & beverage.

Also available:  Sloppy Joe or Polish Sausage – $3; Hot Dogs – $2