All posts by Pat Gustafson

Nurse’s Notes: Take Changes in Stride – 6 Tips for Healthy Transitions

Periods of transition or significant change in your life, whether the death of a loved one, a loss of a job, a divorce, or adjusting to an empty nest, can take a toll on physical, mental and spiritual health.  It’s important to take changes in stride and do your best to keep your health and attitude up even when you feel down.  Here are some tips for coping with change. <!–split–>

ACCEPTANCE   The first step for coping with any change is to fully accept it.  Many times it is already out of your control, so accept that fact, and move forward.

POSITIVITY   Try to visualize the positive aspects of the change.  Transitions happen for a reason, and many times change challenges us in ways that may make us uncomfortable but can strengthen us if we let it.

HONESTY   Take time to honest with yourself and reflect on your emotions but do not let them control you.

GOOD VIBES   Do your best to surround yourself with people who want the best for you and can help feed your positivity and boost your self-esteem.  Being around others with optimistic attitudes can greatly influence your own.

VULNERABILITY   Let yourself be vulnerable and ask for help when you need it.  Realize that you’re not the only one who has faced these obstacles, and seek out those who have had similar experiences and come out on top.

LETTING GO   The most important step of accepting and embracing change is to let go of the past.  Letting go does not mean banishing it or forgetting it ever existed, but make a conscious effort to let the past be the past.  The future is always unfolding, and dwelling on the past does little to help ride that wave.  Keep yourself present in the present!

Lastly, ALLOW YOURSELF TIME   Transitions take time to adjust to and everyone I different and needs a different amount of time.  Don’t worry that you aren’t transitioning properly because it is taking you a different amount of time than it took someone else.  Everyone is different.

— taken from “Church Health”

 Your Parish Nurse,  Kara

From the desk of Pastor Stan – The Lord Is My Shepherd, PSALM 23

I wanted to share this message with you because I think it’s a reminder of why we are so important to God. It also reminds me that I, we are also the apple of God’s eye. I pray that the messages that I preach are always thought provoking and uplifting. Be encouraged! Pastor Stan

SUMMARY

If we would be so bold as to make the claim, the LORD, the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, the Creator of the Universe, is our shepherd, we first need to relinquish our claims of self-sufficiency and acknowledge our need of a shepherd. <!–split–>

 What more can be said about the 23rd Psalm? How many of us were — thankfully — required to memorize it when we were yet barely able to read? How often have we heard it? How often have we recited it? How often have we thrown it up unto the Lord our God, frantically, as our own personal cry of the heart, when (and only when) it seemed as if all else had failed and we could not see the way before us?

Really, what promises this psalm puts forward! It is good for us to return to it often, savoring, pondering each line, rather than thoughtlessly repeating it as an exercise we have been required to commit to memory. Returning to it, even as adults, brings much in the way of rewards. Why has this psalm been commended to legions of youth over the centuries of the church’s life? Simply because it promises so much.

“The LORD is my shepherd, I shall not want ….” This is quite a claim, after all! Who would dare make such a bold statement, a claim bordering on spiritual pride, even arrogance — the LORD, God, the Creator of the Universe, the God of the Exodus, is my shepherd; mine! Who is speaking, here? David? Jesus? Israel? Me? Us? Who could make such a claim?

The Shepherd Of Israel

Israel could, to be sure. The LORD was indeed Israel’s shepherd, as Israel made its collective way out of Egypt, out of slavery, and onto the land promised to them forever, with the LORD, yes, shepherding them with mighty acts of salvation. When Israel was in the wilderness, Israel “wanted” nothing; Israel lacked nothing. The LORD provided what Israel needed: manna for food, water out of a rock, leadership from Moses, correction when straying off to golden calves and to political rebellion. The clothes on their backs did not wear out; the sandals on their feet did not rot away. Surely God shepherded Israel; God provided for Israel as a shepherd provides for sheep.

Even before that time in the wilderness, when Israel was helpless in the iron grip of an oppressor requiring them, literally, to make bricks without straw even then, God was Israel’s shepherd. The Israelites, ground down, could do nothing for themselves. God raised up Moses to lead them out from under Pharaoh’s heel — indeed, even before Moses was born, God was Moses’ shepherd. Moses, born of an unnamed Levite man and an unnamed Levite woman, was shielded from Pharaoh’s grip by the faith and the resourcefulness of his sister Miriam. And Moses, tending his flock in Midian after being driven from Egypt by faithless and ungrateful Israelites, was shepherded, against his own stubborn will, back to Egypt by a Voice calling from a burning bush.

Moses, himself shepherded by God, shepherded Israel out of Egypt. Then, during that time in the wilderness, when the Israelites could do nothing for themselves except complain, God provided food from heaven; God provided water from bare rock. God provided. God was Moses’ shepherd; God was Israel’s shepherd.

                                                        — to be continued in the June “Chimes”

2018 Summer Church Camp

Check out the Camp Guides for 2018. Pick up a brochure outside the office on the wall display.

** Early bird discount if you register and pay in full by April 16, 2018.

** Sibling discount & Bring-a-friend discount.

** Camper scholarships are available.

** Lower Wisconsin River Canoe Trip 7/21 – 7/28

** Hammock Camp

** Sports Camp

** Family Camp

 

Wells4Wellness 2018 Walk For Clean Water

This walk is a community-based and family-oriented, 6-week walking program where we (and you!) live. It involves people throughout the U.S. and the world. It’s not just one day, one place. For more information, please visit the website at www.well4wellness.com. <!–split–>

The walk not only improves your health but also brings the people of Niger, Africa access to fresh clean water. Our goal is to raise $35,000 for 5 wells in 2018. Participants solicit pledges and walk between March 11th and April 22nd. If you would like to donate, place your donations in the offering plate on Sunday and mark it “Wells”.

Bethel Wesley will again be participating as a team. Please join us as we help to make water clean for everyone!  Those participating in the walking team, please be sure to call, email or text your miles in to Kara.  Last year Bethel Wesley’s participation helped build 5 new wells in Niger, Africa.  Think how many people have clean water now and so many children are able to go to school now instead of spending their day walking to haul water!  You are awesome!.  Come join our team!

Your Parish Nurse, Kara

Prepare For Impact

SUMMARY

Jesus Christ lived, died and was raised so that all who believe may live fully for God. Jesus’ resurrection calls all people to move past fear and doubt to embrace the mission of extending God’s offer of abundant life to the world.

Followers of Jesus Christ around the world this season are greeting one another by saying “Christ is risen,” and responding by saying “Christ is risen indeed!” Many of us may mouth these words, but inwardly we may be asking, “So what?” We have heard the story over and over, but it simply remains a story detached from life. <!–split–>

Mark Twain, the great American humorist and writer, penned a classic piece titled “The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County.” In this yarn, Twain narrates an encounter that he had with a man named Simon Wheeler. Twain is interested in learning about a fellow named Rev. Leonidas W. Smiley. This story is ultimately a long rambling narrative about nothing. Instead of telling Twain about the Rev. Smiley, Wheeler spins a long-winded story about a certain Jim Smiley. Wheeler’s narrative goes nowhere and moves from one unrelated story to another.

As we gather today ostensibly to celebrate the resurrection of Jesus, it is worth pondering its interaction with our lives:

  • Is it the center of our lives or is the story of the first Easter morning simply another detached narrative that we store along with any number of other stories that we have heard over the course of our lives?
  • Is it simply a story or is it the story?
  • What difference does it make in our day-to-day lives that Jesus was raised?
  • How has this truth changed us?

Would our lives be any different if Jesus had not been raised?

For Jesus’ earliest followers, the reality of Jesus’ resurrection changed everything. It transformed a group of frightened and doubting people into a revolutionary movement that impacted the entire Roman world. It elevated an obscure Jewish teacher into a figure worthy of universal worship. It sent common fishermen to the far reaches of the world. It can transform our lives today if we have ears to hear and eyes to see.

Our scripture lesson includes two episodes in the aftermath of Jesus’ resurrection and a final comment by the author. In the first, Jesus appears to his remaining disciples (except for Thomas) and breaths into them the Holy Spirit. In the second, Jesus appears to Thomas who had disbelieved his fellow disciples about Jesus’ resurrection. Jesus assuages his doubts, and Thomas recognizes Jesus in all of his fullness and triumph. Our text ends with an editorial comment by the gospel writer, which points to the overall purpose of the story about Jesus.

Embrace The Mission

Unlike Simon Wheeler in the Twain story, the writer of John’s gospel does not mince words or spin tales for the sake of hearing himself talk. The story about Jesus has a purpose. This purpose is life altering and uncompromising. The story of Jesus’ life, death and resurrection points to only one conclusion: Jesus is the only true way to live the life that God created us to live.

This is crucial information. This needs to become the “word on the street.” The Gospel about Jesus Christ is not a maudlin middle-class myth — it is good news. The various stories about Jesus that circulate are not the isolated “Christian” equivalent of Aesop’s fables or like-minded stories intended to teach virtue or ethics. John has gathered these stories together for one purpose and one purpose only: to inspire a life-altering, paradigm-shifting, world-changing belief in Jesus as the long-awaited good news from God, from the God who makes it possible to enjoy life in all of its fullness forever with him.

This is good news for all people. Students of John debate the meaning of “so that you may come to believe” in verse 31. Some Bible versions translate the phrase as though John is writing for the purpose of persuading outsiders to the faith to experience a moment of conversion. Other versions translate the phrase as “so that you may continue to believe.” In this case, the gospel serves to strengthen an already present faith.

In either case, the intention of the John’s gospel and the Gospel message is clear — the story of Jesus’ life, death and resurrection is missional. The Gospel seeks to change everyone who hears it and to shape each person into a follower of Jesus Christ. It calls to those on the outside to become part of the community and it continues to call those on the inside to live fully in light of its good news.

Have we embraced God’s mission? Have we experienced the life that God desires for us to enjoy forever? If not, what is holding us back?

Our scripture lesson suggests that there are at least two stumbling blocks to embracing fully a life-altering belief in Jesus Christ — fear and doubt.

Moving Through Fear

Fear can be paralyzing. Imagine the lives of the disciples in the aftermath of Jesus’ crucifixion. Their dreams had been crushed. Their movement squelched. Their very lives seemed threatened. They must have asked themselves, “Will we be next?”

To see its true paralyzing nature, we need to set the fear of the disciples in its context. In the first two-thirds of John 20, we learn that Jesus’ tomb is empty. Peter and John race to check it out. They find an empty tomb but they are unable to make sense of it. They return home. Only Mary remains at the grave. She encounters Jesus. Jesus sends her to share the good news with the disciples. She returns to the disciples and announces, “I have seen the Lord.”1

Apparently, this eyewitness report from a trusted friend of Jesus did not lessen the fear of the disciples one iota. They remain locked in their house.

How many of us do not fully embrace the mission of Jesus out of fear? Yet there is a great irony at work. The Gospel claims that God has conquered even the power of death. Yet fear at its roots concerns itself with self-preservation. If God has indeed raised Jesus from the dead, what is left to fear?

The words of Martin Luther’s great hymn, “A Mighty Fortress in Our God,” come to mind: “The body they may kill. God’s truth abideth still; His kingdom is forever!”

Jesus appears to his frightened disciples and breathes the Holy Spirit on them. The Spirit empowers them to overcome fear and embrace the mission of Jesus. Jesus authorizes them to serve a high calling — the extending of forgiveness to others on behalf of God. The life to which God calls us is one that gives life to others. Back in John 10:10, Jesus promised an abundant life. This life begins with the restoration of relationship with God through forgiveness. When we move through fear to embrace life, God’s Spirit empowers us to participate in God’s mission.

What are we afraid of this day? What is keeping us from embracing the life that God created us to live? If Jesus is alive, how can fear keep us from true life? What would it take to move us past our fear?

Moving Through Doubt

Doubt is a second great stumbling block to the life that God desires for us. Thomas, forever remembered in the annals of Christendom as “Doubting Thomas,” is unable to believe that Jesus is alive. Even after his fellow disciples proclaim, “We have seen the Lord,” he remains in disbelief. Doubt is as paralyzing as fear. If fear keeps us from committing ourselves fully out of self-interest, doubt prevents us from fully embracing an idea or movement because of the fact that we might be wrong.

Many of us today are able to grasp the idea of Jesus’ resurrection. Many of us are even able to recognize the incredible power that such an event would have. But many of us doubt. This is understandable. Thomas doubted and he was much closer to the events than any of us ever will be.

But doubt cannot keep us from Jesus Christ. Christian faith is neither naïve nor wrong-headed. It is based on the reality of Jesus’ resurrection. The gospel of John deals with Thomas’ doubt by reporting that Jesus met him face to face. In other words, John concedes that Thomas doubted, but Thomas did not remain in doubt. Something happened — Jesus the risen Lord appeared to him. Thomas was transformed from a doubter to one of the most zealous disciples in terms of mission. Thomas is alleged to have carried the Gospel personally as far east as India before his death.

The gospels include other scenes of doubt in the face of Jesus’ resurrection,2 but nowhere does doubt thwart a life-changing faith. There are simply too many eyewitness accounts to be frozen by doubt.

Throughout the centuries, many women and men have had their doubts about Jesus, but time and time again, careful investigation ultimately leads to a life-changing faith. If any of us sit here this morning trapped in a prison of doubt, do not give up. Seek after the truth and it will set you free.

Nurse’s Notes: 15 Germy Things You Touch Every Day

There are things we use every day and give little thought to the germs they may carry.  Keeping these items clean may just help keep you healthy and free from infections.

  1. Cellphone – It goes with you everywhere — even into the bathroom. As a result, it could be up to 10 times dirtier than a toilet seat. In fact, it could have  E.coli on it. That’s a bacteria that can give you diarrhea and stomach cramps. It can live for hours on a warm surface like your phone. The solution: Wash your hands with soap after you go.
  2. Remote Control – Everyone touches it — even the neighbor’s kid who picks his nose nonstop. And when it isn’t in your germy hands, it’s either on the floor or stuck between the sofa cushions — a cozy, dark home for mold and bacteria. Give it a going-over with antibacterial wipes every so often. <!–split–>
  3. Computer Keyboard – You eat lunch over it at work. The kids log on at home and wipe their runny noses while they play their favorite game. The cat hops up for a nap after she leaves the litter box. No surprise it’s covered in germs. To clean things up:  Shut down your computer. Give your keyboard a few good shakes to get rid of loose crumbs.  Use rubbing alcohol on a cotton ball or pad to clean around each key.
  4. Dish Sponge – Surprise! It’s the dirtiest thing in your house. By a long shot. That makes sense: It’s wet, absorbent, and you rub food and dirt with it all the time. Sponges are hard to keep clean. Your best bet?  Replace it when it starts to smell.
  5. Toothbrush Holder – How can this be? Your toothpaste kills germs, doesn’t it? Yes, but a lot of them stick to the bristles and drip onto the holder. This spot has one of the highest bacteria readings of anything you touch. Clean it often. One easy way: Remove the gunk, then stick it in the dishwasher.
  6. Anything in the Office Break Room – The microwave, refrigerator doors & faucet are all covered in bacteria. The vending machine buttons aren’t that clean, either. The damp, dark reservoir in your coffee maker could be full of yeast & mold. Wash your hands before & after you touch the appliances. Rinse the coffee pot between uses; run vinegar through it monthly.
  7. Dog Toys – You’ve probably heard a dog’s mouth is cleaner than a human’s. Doubtful. It isn’t that Fido has fewer germs, he just has different ones. Every time he slobbers on Mr. Squeaky, he doesn’t just transfer bacteria, he creates a sticky wet place for other germs to thrive. There’s no telling what his plaything picks up as he drags it around. Clean rubber toys by hand or in the dishwasher (top shelf only). Toss fabric ones into the wash.
  8. Money – You grab it all the time with your germy hands. So do other people. Researchers found that most dollar bills are covered in 3,000 types of bacteria — everything from the germs that cause acne to microbes from people who lick their fingers when they count out bills. Some countries are printing money on plastic, but the U.S. has yet to take that step. Until we have a cleaner option, wash up after you handle that cash.
  9. Your Office Coffee Cup – You fill it with coffee made from water that sits in a yeast and mold-filled tank. Then you wash it with a dirty sponge that’s full of bacteria. Take it home every day and run it through the dishwasher. At least use dish soap and paper towels if you clean it at work.
  10. The Laundry – Think a quick spin in the washer and dryer will get things clean? Maybe not. One study found that some nasty viruses, including rotavirus, which causes severe stomach troubles, made it through the spin cycle and the dryer. Wash things like underwear on hot, use bleach when you can, and don’t skimp on the drying time.
  11. Your Purse – You stick your hands in it all the time. So do your kids. But you rarely clean it. That accounts for the bacteria that live inside it. The places you leave it, like dirty counters, bathroom stalls, and car floorboards, account for icky travelers on the outside. Hang it on a hook when you can, and clean it with antibacterial wipes. Think about the outside, too — pebbly or uneven surfaces can make better homes for bugs than smooth ones.
  12. The ATM – People from anywhere and everywhere touch buttons on the cash machine. Scientists in New York City found microbes left behind from food like fish and chicken, bacteria from rotting plant and dairy products, and mold linked to spoiled baked goods. There wasn’t a difference between indoor or outdoor machines, but the ones in laundromats and stores were the dirtiest.
  13. Shopping Carts – You fill it with meat and then grab the handle. You sit your little one in it, and she fills her diaper. Birds poop on it while it’s out in the parking lot. That’s why cart handles and seats are often home to  E.coli, campylobacter, and salmonella, all of which cause diarrhea. If your store provides wipes near the cart corral, use them.
  14. Soap Dispensers – Your hands aren’t exactly clean when you give that soap dispenser a nudge, but that isn’t always the reason it’s full of bacteria. The soap inside the gadget can get contaminated if it’s refilled before it’s completely empty. If you wash with it, you’ll transfer the germs to anything you touch afterward.  Wash thoroughly and use paper towels to dry — jet air dryers can spread germs, too.
  15. Kitchen Towel – You don’t just dry your dishes and hands with it. You use it to clean off grimy little hands and faces or wipe up spills on dirty counters. The result: Your dish towel can be home to nasty things like salmonella or fecal bacteria. Good news: The more often you wash your towels, the fewer critters call them home. Soak them for 2 minutes in bleach first.

Your Parish Nurse, Kara

Meeting God During Lent

It’s my sincere prayer and hope that during this season of Lent that we will draw closer to God and seek to do His will.

Here we are: It’s the season of Lent, and I’m wondering if I should tell you the truth about it. Most of us pastors agree that this is the most important season of the church year, seven weeks that come to a grand climax with Easter Sunday. Church attendance is traditionally at its best in this season. The most loyal believers look for ways to deepen their faith, and even those out on the periphery often acknowledge that during this period  they hope to do better than they’ve been doing. But as we gather on this Sunday, I keep asking myself if I should tell you the truth about it all. <!–split–>

Perhaps I should begin by telling you where Lent comes from. For many hundreds of years, Christians have set aside 40 days before Easter as a time of preparation for Easter. These 40 days have been counted in a variety of ways, but for many centuries they have been the 40 days between Ash Wednesday and Easter, except for the Sundays.

Why 40? Because through the Bible, 40 has been the number for testing, or in some cases, the solitude that provides a setting for testing. Thus, Moses was alone with God for 40 days as he received the Ten Commandments, and the prophet Elijah traveled for 40 days and nights without food to reach Horeb, the mount of God.

But the number 40 came to its highest significance in the life of our Lord Jesus Christ, which is the story in our Scripture lesson of the day. Jesus had just been baptized by John. It was an electric moment, for as Jesus was coming out of the water, the Holy Spirit descended on him like a dove, and a voice from heaven said, “This is my Son, the Beloved, with whom I am well pleased.”

Into The Wilderness          

Then, the very Holy Spirit that had so signally recognized Jesus led him “into the wilderness,” where he was tempted by the devil. There he fasted for 40 days and 40 nights. It must have been a time of very intense seeking of God. Some of us know what it is to fast for a meal or for a day. Once, long ago, I fasted for three days. But 40 days! I can’t even imagine it. More than that, they were days of utter solitude. In such a wilderness, the sounds of human life are lost in silence, and in the subtle, usually unheard, voices of nature.

I’m told that after several days of fasting, one’s desire for feed begins to diminish. At the same time, a person’s spiritual sensitivity is greater. The barrier between the soul and God slowly fades, until at times the divine is more real than the natural. I suspect that Jesus was enjoying just such communion with his Father. Still fresh from the waters of baptism, eager to begin the ministry that was the purpose of his being, Jesus must have felt as if he would burst with the excitement of what lay ahead.

Then a discord shattered the ecstatic beauty. It was a quiet voice, but a demanding one. There was no escaping it. The voice that so long ago had intruded on the perfection of Eden now invaded Jesus’ holy solitude. “You’re hungry, aren’t you?” (He had almost forgotten that hunger existed.) “If you are the Son of God, command these stones to become bread.”

Temptation is always complex, probably because you and I are such complex creatures. There was the very real, natural fact of hunger. When one hasn’t eaten for 40 days and nights, the insistence of appetite may have diminished, but the need is crucially real. There’s a limit to how long the body can go without fuel, and now that the suggestion had been made, natural need must have come on like a flood.

But more than that, there was a challenge to Jesus’ very identity. The baptismal voice had said, 40 days earlier, “my Son, the Beloved.” Now the devil snickered, “If it’s so, prove it! Goodness knows you need bread, so put your supposed powers to some good and practical use.”

As the gospel writer tells the story, Jesus met the temptation quickly, easily, succinctly. I wonder, though, if the Master’s answer came slowly, perhaps even haltingly, out of a huge wrestling of the soul? We can never know. In any event, when he gave his answer, the enemy moved to a whole new playing field. This time the temptation had to do with the power and goodness of God. The devil reminded him of a promise in the book of Psalms, and suggested that he should leap from the pinnacle of the temple, because God’s angels will watch over those who trust him.

As temptations go, this may well be the most popular one these days. We live in a culture where people expect to get what they want, and to get it fast. So we treat God the way inconsiderate people treat a table server. “I want healing. A better job. A bigger house. A growing church.” “And why shouldn’t I ask it?” someone says. “Doesn’t God want the best for us?”

God does, indeed, want the best for us. And the truth is, in many cases if we got the things we ask for, right at the moment we request them, it would be like casting ourselves from the pinnacle of the temple; getting what we want would destroy us. The promises of God are very wonderful; so wonderful that we’re sometimes tempted to worship the promises rather than worshiping God. Our power-hungry, give-me-what-I-want age needs desperately to know that God is God and we are not, and that God can be trusted to know how our prayers are best answered.

The devil tried again. (You may have noticed that the devil is persistent.) He held out before Jesus “all the kingdoms of the world and their splendor,” and offered them if only Jesus would fall down and worship him. I believe the most important thing Jesus knew about himself was this, that he had come into the world to die, and that the course he must take would lead eventually to a cross. On the surface, the devil’s offer was appealing. Jesus gave a clear, fierce answer. “Away with you Satan! For it is written, ‘Worship the Lord your God, and serve only him.’”

 Big Soul-Business

Now here’s the part I’ve hesitated to tell you. This wilderness experience ― the 40 days and nights of fasting, that concluded in such incisive temptation ― this is the basis for our Lenten season. Hundreds of years ago our Christian ancestors, led by the Holy Spirit, set aside 40 days of preparation for Easter, and they built the whole idea around Jesus in the wilderness.

Which is to say, Lent is really big business. Big soul-business. So it’s no wonder that we’re inclined to cut it down to size. We like to put easy chairs in our Lenten wilderness, with refreshment centers and frequent reminders that God will bless us for what we’re doing. I know, because that’s the way I like to go about it. We mean well, but we want a manageable wilderness. Some of us have planned to give up something for Lent, especially if by doing so we might also reduce our waistline. Others of us intend to begin, or to improve, a habit of daily devotions. Still others have promised God that they will make a special Easter offering.

And bless your hearts, all of this is good. I don’t want to discourage you from it. But I’d like so much if we would remember that the idea of Lent was born in a wilderness. I’m troubled that our culture has influenced us so to the point that the only cross some folks can imagine is one we wear as a necklace or a lapel pin. We have forgotten that Christianity is a heroic religion, one that produces spiritual giants. And it does that because some of us choose, voluntarily, to go into a wilderness of true discipline, in the hope that we might become the kind of people God intends us to be.

 Free But Not Cheap

There’s one more thing, to be honest, that I must tell you. I hesitate to do so, because it might sound as if I’m softening the hard truth I’ve just described. But it’s part of this Bible account, so here it is. Matthew tells us that after Jesus had resisted the devil, “Then the devil left him, and suddenly angels came and waited on him.”

This Christian life is a magnificent way. It does, indeed, include angels, and bread for life’s journey, and God’s power and glory. But these things are too real to be cheap. Mind you, they’re free, because they’re gifts of grace, but they’re not cheap. They’re most likely to be found by those of us who are ready to follow our Lord into the wilderness of a high discipline.

I invite you, this very day, to join me in that Lenten commitment.