Category Archives: Pastor’s Page

A Love Story That Will Not End

Jesus said to her, “Mary.” She turned toward him and cried out in Aramaic, “Rabboni!” (which means “Teacher”). Jesus said, “Do not hold on to me … Go instead to my brothers and tell them ‘I am ascending to my Father and your Father, to my God and your God.’”— John 20:16–17

The Resurrection is an unprecedented event in history. In the words of C. S. Lewis, it is a miracle of the New Creation. Something of which the world has had no previous experience at all has entered the old order and radically altered it. The great reversal has begun. The new wine has burst the old wineskins. Even familiar relations with Jesus in the old creation no longer suffice. Now, it seems he can only be recognized by those to whom he chooses to reveal himself. <!–split–>

The story of the Resurrection is also the story of human love at its best. When all else fails—even faith and hope—love comes through intact. It may be weak in comparison to divine love, but it is strong enough to move the heart of the Lover. Such is the love of Mary Magdalene.

What makes Mary’s devotion to Jesus unique may have begun early in his ministry when he cast seven demons out of her (Luke 8:1–3). Mary had known the terrifying power of spiritual enslavement and the  exhilarating freedom of following Christ her teacher. Here was a Rabbi who treated women very differently. From that day, her admiration and love grew.

Mary followed Jesus to Jerusalem. When all the other disciples fled (Mark 14:50), she stood in solidarity with other women to witness his agonizing death on the cross (Matt. 27:55). Love refuses to be cowed. Love perseveres when hope is extinguished. Mary witnessed Jesus’ limp body being taken down from the cross. He was dead! But love will not give up.

She continued to follow Jesus to the point where she could go no further. The tomb was finally clamped shut. Sabbath was about to begin. She had to leave, but not without first taking note of where his body lay (Mark 15:47).

Mary could not wait for the Sabbath to be over. At the first streaks of dawn, she hurried to the tomb. Love drove her back. Perhaps all she wanted was to be with the Beloved—if only to run her hand over the cold, defiant rock that blocks the tomb’s entrance. But further dismay greeted her: The stone had been removed and the body was gone. Without a second thought, she hurried back and reported it to Peter and John.

John reached the tomb entrance first and hesitated, but Peter, true to form, barged in. The sight defied  explanation, for they “still did not understand from Scripture that Jesus had to rise from the dead” (John 20:9). Peter and John tried to figure out what might have happened. They were practical men looking for plausible explanations, and finding none, they decided to leave.

But Mary lingered. She would not give up so easily. But where is he? Why? No, it can’t be—perhaps a   jumble of foreboding thoughts filled her mind. Could it be the work of grave robbers? Perhaps anger welled up at the thought of unconscionable men desecrating Jesus’ body. Mary could take it no more; she broke down in tears.

She moved closer to the tomb and saw two angels. Their brief exchange suggests that they seemed harmless, ordinary folks. Just then Jesus appeared and asked: “Why are you crying?” But Mary could not recognize the voice. Thinking that he was the gardener, she pleaded with him to tell him where he might have carried away the body of Jesus, saying, “and I will get him”—I will carry him (John 20:15). She did not consider how she would do it. These are words of a determined woman. Whatever it took, she’d find the body and carry it back.

Was Mary so blinded by her tears that she could not recognize Jesus? Not likely. The Gospels record other instances when the resurrected Jesus was not recognized until he chose to make himself recognizable, such as the two disciples on the road to Emmaus who only recognized Jesus through the breaking of bread. For Mary, the voice of the “gardener” suddenly sounded familiar when Jesus called her by name.

Mary’s love had been stretched to breaking point—almost. But then Jesus revealed himself and spoke her name in the familiar voice that she had heard countless times before. In the depth of despair, her “teacher” had found her. She recognized his reassuring voice. She instinctively clung to him, driven by love that will not let go.

But she could not make Christ exclusively her own. Love must at some point yield to the will of the Lover: “Do not hold on to me, for I have not yet ascended to the Father. Go instead to my brothers and tell them, ‘I am ascending to my Father and your Father, to my God and your God’ ” (v. 17).

Following Jesus had brought Mary to the brink of despair, but love finally broke through the old order. She became the first witness of the risen Christ and the first bearer of the Good News: The Father of Jesus is now our Father and Jesus is now our brother (Heb. 2:11, 12). But Mary was not a witness in the formal sense, for in her culture a testimony was validated by at least two witnesses and among the Jews, the status of a woman as a witness was a contested issue. What Jesus did for her can only be understood as an act of pure love in response to her singular devotion.

Mary Magdalene’s relentless pursuit of her Beloved exemplifies the spiritual quest for deeper union with God. Like other contemplatives, mystics, and saints in subsequent Christian history, Mary teaches us that love never fails—even when hope fails. It sustained her through the dark night of Holy Saturday into the dawn of Easter. Even as Mary clings to Christ, she also learns to let go. The ecstasy of her reunion with the Beloved was not meant to be for her alone to enjoy. He called her to go into the world and bear witness to the Resurrection:   “I have seen the Lord!” From Mary, we begin to understand why love is the greatest theological virtue (1 Cor. 13:13). From her, too, we learn that however much we relish mountain-top experiences of intimacy with God, we must also descend to bring the Good News of the living Christ to a dying world.

— (from Christianity Today)

A PASSION FOR GOD!

If I have found grace in Your sight, show me now Your way, that I may know You . . . (Exodus 33:13)

Many people give up everything for an ideal, sacrificing themselves in order to reach the goal that is the  passion of their lives.  For example, an athlete preparing for a competition leads a rigorous life with severe privations.  Such passion ought to characterize Christians as they seek God’s face.  We must burn with the spiritual fire that burned in Paul (Philippians 3:8-11), Jeremiah, Moses – men who did not feel satisfied with themselves regarding their own spiritual lives.  They longed to know God intimately. <!–split–>

There was a time in my ministry when I would be told how tremendous the worship service was, but I was unsatisfied.  I would pray: “Lord, I know there are rivers and springs overflowing with the Holy Spirit.  I want to know You better.”  God put that thirst in me.  When I sought Him passionately, I found what I  needed.

When I understood that fellowship with the Spirit is more than addressing words to God,  I was transformed.  I reached a new stage in my life and ministry.  Everything was fresh and renewed with no religious routine.  Unable to sleep at night, I instead had fellowship with Him.  My experience affected crowds.

We must seek God’s face.  The people of Israel wanted to witness God’s great works, but they did not want God himself.  How different was Moses’ attitude!  He witnessed the miracles, but he prayed to know God.   (Exodus 3:13, 18).

From the Desk of Pastor Stan

Christian writer Kathleen Norris tells “the scariest story I know about the Bible” in her book Amazing Grace: A Vocabulary of Faith. Norris recalls a conversation she and her husband once had in a local steak house with one of their South Dakota neighbors, a grandson of “dirt-poor immigrants” who now owned several thousand acres and bought new cars for his family every year; a man who had now begun treatment for a probable terminal cancer. That night this man of few words, who usually spoke about business when he did speak, began telling about receiving a wedding gift, many years before, from his devout grandfather.  <!–split–>

Norris says:   His wedding present to Arlo and his bride had been a Bible, which he admitted he admired mostly because it was an expensive gift, bound in white leather, with their names and the date of their wedding set in gold lettering on the cover. “I left it in its box and it ended up in our bedroom closet,” Arlo told us. “But,” he said, “for months afterward, every time we saw grandpa he would ask me how I liked that bible. The wife had written him a thank you note, and we’d thanked him in person, but somehow he couldn’t let it lie, he’d always keep asking about it.” Finally, Arlo grew curious as to why the old man kept after him. “Well,” he said, “the joke was on me. I finally took that Bible out of the closet and found that granddad had placed a twenty-dollar bill at the beginning of the Book of Genesis, and at the beginning of every book … over thirteen hundred dollars in all. And he knew I’d never find it.”

***

I knew little about how to practice Christian faith when I first began attending church, in my early days. But I had heard the Bible is The Book for Christians. So I started reading… It didn’t take long to figure out the Bible is a book made up of many shorter books, booklets, gospels, and letters, in all, 66 books-within-The-Book in Protestant Bibles (more in Catholic and Orthodox Bibles), written by many different authors over a range of times. And it almost goes without saying that I found some of the Bible much easier to read than other parts.

Some of what I read in the Bible made sense immediately. Other parts began to make sense with prayer and more thought. Still other parts made little sense even after quite a bit of prayer and pondering. But I don’t usually mind pondering… And I was aware Christians have seldom if ever been entirely all of one-mind as to what the Bible means… So I read the parts I liked often, the other parts less often… A few parts not at all…

Till one day, reading the liner notes of Duke Ellington’s first Sacred Music Concert record, where Duke wrote saying he ‘began to understand the Bible a little, after reading it cover to cover, three times.’ Equal parts shamed and inspired by Duke, I resolved to read through the Bible three times – reading three or four chapters a day of the Old Testament along with daily readings of a few psalms, and a chapter each of the New Testament gospels and letters. (This got me through the Old Testament once and the New Testament several times in a year.)

Forty-some years later, I’m still reading the Bible nearly every day, and still learning what life and the Bible are about every day… There are still parts of life and the Bible I don’t understand well. I have been given gift Bibles, and though I haven’t found money stuck inside the pages of any of them, I have found in all of them the gift beyond price. (See Matthew 13:44-45.)

I still don’t understand all of the Bible – but I have come to understand – reading the Bible prayerfully and studying with other believers are two sides of one essential spiritual practice for Christians – and prayer, worship, witness, and works of mercy, justice, and love, our other most basic practices – all depend on listening to God through God’s word.

May God give us grace to open wide the scriptures – and find treasure far beyond price.

The grace and peace of Jesus Christ our Savior be with you,  Pastor Stan

Through a Glass Darkly (Editorial by Rob Renfroe)

Recently I read an editorial in the magazine Good News: Leading United Methodist to a Faithful Future. The article entitled, Through A Glass Darkly, focused on the Special General Conference to be held in February and the decision on human sexuality in our denomination as we move forward. Is there any hope? Yes, God is good and God is sovereign I believe he still has a plan for the people called Methodist.” Read it, pray about it and may the Holy Ghost lead you in forming an informative decision.   – Pastor Stan   <!–split–>

What will happen at the special General Conference this February? Right now, it’s anyone’s guess.  We see through a glass darkly, not able to predict with confidence what the delegates will do and knowing that God can always surprise us and provide a solution to our problems that none of us imagined.  Frankly, that’s what I’m praying for.

However, there are a few options that, at this point, seem most likely.  Two that we can take off the board are the Simple Plan and the Connectional Conference Plan.

The Simple Plan goes too far.  It redefines marriage as two adults, condones sex outside of marriage, prevents conservative annual conferences from refusing to ordain practicing gay persons, and allows pastors throughout the connection to marry gay couples.  Whenever similar proposals have come before General Conference in the past, they have been defeated by a wide margin.  The majority of the UM Church has not yet moved this far in a progressive direction.

The Connectional Conference Plan (CCP) creates three jurisdictions, each one with a different sexual ethic.  No coalition has formed to support it and no group is doing the hard work of promoting it to the rest of the church.  The CCP requires numerous constitutional amendments and there is little likelihood that a super majority of both General Conference delegates and then later of annual conference delegates around the globe will support it.

The plan with the greatest likelihood of passing is the Tradition Plan (TP).  It maintains our present position of affirming the worth of and welcoming all persons to the ministries of the church without allowing for practicing gay persons to be ordained or for our pastors to marry gay couples.  The Traditional Plan has several provisions that would allow the church to enforce the Book of Discipline more effectively when pastors and bishops violate our policies.  Each of these provisions will need to be approved individually.

Why is the TP most likely to pass?  Because it is most in line with what delegates have supported at every General Conference since 1972.  It was the plan that the majority of the delegates supported less than three years ago in Portland – most of whom will be voting again in St. Louis.  Whether all of the enhanced accountability measures can be passed remains to be seen.  But it is most likely that a Traditional Plan of sorts will prevail. And a Traditional Plan provides the most hopeful path to a faithful future for the United Methodist Church.

(part 2 continued in March Chimes)

New Beginning

For those of you who know me, you know that I’m a book’s best friend. I recently read this thought about two journeys for the soul. One goes from place to place seeking something or someone to             satisfy. It is often disappointed and soon picks up and journeys again. The other is a journey to Jesus Christ. There one finds a peace that is lasting and a presence that satisfies and fulfills. So New Year is supremely a time for decision. By the mercies of God we have been brought and blessed with the opportunity to begin again. The New Year, however is not altogether unexplored territory. As we move through it, we shall find some well-trodden paths, and we shall see the footprints of the saints who have walked the way of God before us, the way that God himself marked out when he clothed himself in our flesh and dwelt among us full of grace and truth.  <!–split–>

There will always be a familiar sign in front of us. “This is the way; walk ye in it.” This year let us follow that sign and we shall move toward that city whose maker and builder is God. Should we choose to ignore that sign and wander into the path of our own devising, and soon the territory of  tomorrow will take on the dreary, futile appearance of all our wasted yesterdays.

 —Pastor Stan

FROM THE DESK OF PASTOR STAN: “The Undivided Heart” (part 3) by Carolyn Moore

The people did what people mostly do.  They allowed the voice of fear to drown out the voice of potential and it cost them dearly.  That day, God turned them back from the border of promise.  He sent them out into the wilderness again where he promptly vowed that not one of their generation would see the land flowing with milk and honey.  Fear would not be woven into the DNA of his chosen people, not if God had anything to do with it.  <!–split–>

So the people got in the wilderness what they were most afraid of getting in the Promised Land.  They were destroyed by their own choice.  For 38 years they wandered like dead men walking before another generation found itself toe-to-toe with God’s purposes.

I wonder if most of that first generation even knew how close they were to greatness?  I wonder if, way down the road, some of them sat around campfires and wondered aloud, “What do you suppose would have become of us if we had listened to Joshua and Caleb?  How do you suppose it would have turned out?”  Did they even stop to think about it as they poked their fires or packed up their tents yet again or held their cups beneath water flowing from rocks?

Did they think that deeply? Did they assume, like most people, that what they had twenty or thirty years out from that decision was all there was?  Did they ever stop to imagine more than mediocrity punctuated by death?  Or did they simply go about their lives, making grocery lists, making beds, making a living, making do?

I wonder, but I can’t judge.  After all, I am an Israelite myself.  I peek over into spiritual promises and my little internal band of spies reports back, “That’ll never work for you,” and far too often I listen to those voices of fear or laziness or institutional caution and I miss out.

Who knows how long I’ve wandered, unaware of the promises I’ve turned down, while God in his mercy determines to kill of all in me that reeks of fear?

Who knows how long our denomination as a whole will wander, while God in his mercy determines to kill off all in us that reeks of fear?  What if, even now, we are wandering in a desert of our own making, unable to image more than mediocrity punctuated by death?  Friends, fear is a killer.  It kills spirits and can even thwart great moves of God.  I hope we are not hanging on to an institution simply because we are afraid of stepping into God’s vision for us.

Are you resolved to devote yourself wholly?  Not half-heartedly.  Not with your spare change and spare time.  Not only as far as your comforts will take you.   Not fearfully, but wholly to God and God’s work?  In your study and worship and fellowship and serving and in the truth you share, be passionately committed to the pursuit of wholeness so you can be in passionate pursuit of the presence of Christ.  Without that kind of vulnerable, wholehearted faith it is impossible to please God.

FROM THE DESK OF PASTOR STAN: “The Undivided Heart” (part 2) by Carolyn Moore

Paralyzing fear takes away our power to fight the enemy.  We become reactionary and prone toward survival-level decisions.  Fear makes for terrible career choices.  What spiritual work do you need to do in order to admit to and deal with the irrational and self-limiting fears in your life?  Are you resolved to do that healing work?  Resolved does not mean “only if it gets out of control” or ‘until something better comes along.”  Resolved means surrendered, submitted, committed, sacrificially obedient.  Being resolved to devote myself wholly to God means going after wholeness in my life, no matter the cost. <!–split–>

Too much of our conversation in The United Methodist Church is driven by fear.  For decades, fear has kept us from talking lovingly and honestly about our differences.  Fear is keeping congregations from frank discussions about our current crisis.  Fear has kept us in a defensive crouch.  Fear has kept us from acknowledging the depth of our divide. We have wanted to characterize it as a simple paper cut when it is in fact a gaping wound breeding infection.  By minimizing the differences, we may stifle a crisis that is actually our opportunity – if we’re bold enough to accept change as a good thing – to give clearly unique theological positions a chance to live with more integrity and to prove themselves by their fruit.

I hear echoes of angels in this moment before us, encouraging “Be not afraid.” Meanwhile, we shrink back, for fear of what we might lose if we act boldly.

Fear is the great enemy of wholeheartedness.

Two years after the Israelites were delivered from their five hundred years of oppressive slavery in Egypt, they found themselves standing on the brink of the land God promised them.  To get to this place, they had seen waters part and enemies drown.  Yahweh was intimately involved with their lives.  They knew him.  They followed him.  And just two short years after packing up and moving out of bondage, there they stood on the brink of God’s best.  Yes, there were vicious armies and untamed wilds on the other side of that border, but they had the smoke and fire of God blazing their trail.

Then it happened.  Human nature kicked in.

They became more cautious than optimistic.  There at the edge of God’s plan, they sent a dozen spies into that question mark of a promise to check things out.  Then returning spies slinked back with a warning: “Don’t do it! It is great real estate, but the people are giants.  We will all die if we go over there.” The majority report was full of fear and trepidation.

The other two spies – young men named Joshua and Caleb – looked on that land and saw a future with hope.  For them, the land was more possibility than problems.  “I think we should do this,” they challenged.  “This is God’s land and God’s fight.  Let God defend us!”

FROM THE DESK OF PASTOR STAN: “The Undivided Heart” by Carolyn Moore

Most anyone who has ever held a part time position in a church will be the first to tell you there is really no such thing as “part time” in church work.  “Part-time” is a carrot they dangle so they can get you on the payroll and soak up every minute of you, but maybe that isn’t such a bad thing.  This work, however, is not meant to be carried out with our leftover time or leftover money.  Jesus never gave us that option.  He calls those who follow earnestly to take up  crosses, die to self, leave it all on the table.  We are even told that those who preach and teach are held to a higher standard.  “Not many of you should become teachers, my fellow believers,” James warns, “because you know that we who teach will be judged more strictly” (James 3:1). <!–split–>

If the only option open to us is wholeheartedness – being wholly devoted to God and his work – then how do we know we have it?  What is the litmus test for wholeheartedness?  What spiritual work must we tackle before we can give ourselves completely to this vocation of serving Jesus?  We know from both Scripture and experience that it isn’t our skill set that gets us there, nor is it our awesome connections or superior ability to do everything just right.  This business of wholeheartedness is a spiritual operation.  It is what it says it is:  heart-level wholeness.

What does it mean to become whole, by biblical standards?  Surely it begins with Paul’s advice to work out your own salvation daily with fear and trembling.  Stay in it, Paul advises, and wrestle with what it looks like in your life.  Let the daily wrestling expose the cracks and wounds.  Deal with the unholy fears that paralyze you, leaving you stranded out there in the desert, unable to make the journey into the promises of God.  Acknowledge your doubts, and dare to believe God can handle them. To become wholehearted, we must deal with our wounds and hesitations, fears and doubts, even as we develop eyes to see what God sees.

When I was a little girl, I often had nightmares. I’d wake up petrified and run for my parents’ room.  I wanted my mother’s comfort.  But it was dark, and things in the dark look ominous. If there was anything on the floor of their bedroom – clothes, bedroom shoes, anything that could be misinterpreted in the dark – I’d end up standing paralyzed in the doorway, just feet from their bed, unable to reach my mom for fear of what that thing on the floor might be.  I always assumed the worst.

Carry the remnants of those early fears into adulthood and they begin to look remarkable familiar to many of us. We allow all kinds of things to generate fear within, to stand between us and the comfort we so desperately need.  We become afraid of getting too close to others, afraid of losing control, afraid of going too far with God, maybe even afraid of succeeding (too much pressure!).  We can become paralyzed by irrational fears.  The writer of Leviticus has our number.  He describes a conversation between God and his people.  If the Israelites continue to disobey, their land will be devastated and the people will be scattered.  “And for those of you who survive, I will demoralize you in the land of your enemies.  You will live in such fear that the sound of a leaf driven by the wind will send you fleeing.  You will run as though fleeing from a sword and you will fall even when no one pursues you.  Though no one is chasing you, you will stumble over each other as though fleeing from a sword.  You will have no power to stand up against your enemies” (Leviticus 26:36-37 NLT).

(CONTINUED NEXT MONTH)

From The Desk Of Pastor Stan

This article is from the United Methodist “Good News” publication. 

I wanted to share it with you . . .

 “Outwitted by God” by James V. Heidinger II

Maxie Dunnam was reluctant to write God Outwitted Me: The Stories of my Life (Seedbed).  He feared it might appear self-serving.  And after all, he had already written some 40 books and felt that he had told the stories about his life as he was  living it.  While he was urged by many to write such a work, we are deeply indebted to his wife, Jerry, for the nudge that was “the final straw that pushed me over the edge.”  She urged him to write it if for “no other reason, for our children and grandchildren.” <!–split–>

As I write these words, I find myself wanting to thank Jerry repeatedly for that nudge.  I also thank J.D. Walt and the Seedbed team for publishing this rich, relevant, and deeply moving memoir.  The word memoir, rather than autobiography, is Maxie’s choice.  “I’m reminiscing and reflecting,” he writes.  “Some may even say I’m ‘preaching and teaching’ about my experiences.”  These are, indeed, the stories of his life, and Methodists around the world will be deeply moved, instructed, and blessed by them.  Bishops would do well to recommend it to their pastors.

Maxie Dunnam was born in deeply rural Mississippi in 1934, when the country was still feeling the seismic effects of the Great Depression.  He knew poverty and deprivation and paints vivid word pictures of the bleakness of his childhood years.  His home had no electricity or plumbing, and a pathway led down to the outdoor toilet with its memorable, pungent odors.  He recalls the 200-yard trek the family made to get water from a spring.

It was from this humble, backwoods setting that Maxie Dunnam, at age 13, responded to the Gospel he heard preached by Brother Wiley Grissom at Eastside Baptist Church.  As he went forward, his father was right behind him to profess faith in Christ.  The next Sunday, they both were baptized at nearby Thompson Creek.  I admired Maxie’s telling of Brother Grissom’s influence on his life.  Though the Baptist preacher had only a 5th grade education, Maxie showed no condescension toward the uneducated Baptist preacher who had brought him to Christ.  Maxie noted that later, while president of Asbury Theological Seminary, he often thought of Brother Grissom.  “Memory of him kept me aware of the fact that calling and anointing are as important (ultimately, maybe more important) as education.”

From this rural Mississippi setting, came a humble young man who became an effective Methodist minister, served churches faithfully, became the World Editor of the Upper Room devotional, and while there founded the church’s Walk to Emmaus program and helped launch the Academy for Spiritual Formation.  He became a leader in the World Methodist Council, served as senior pastor of Christ United Methodist Church in Memphis, Tennessee, and then in 1994 was elected President of Asbury Theological Seminary in Wilmore, Kentucky.  After serving as seminary president for 10 years, Maxie, along with his wife, Jerry, returned to Christ UM Church in Memphis where he serves today on the staff as minister-at-large along with senior pastor Shane Stanford.  What an extraordinary journey! One senses in this compelling work the pivotal role that prayer has played in Maxie’s ministry, as well as the impressive reality of how Maxie and Jerry were always a team doing ministry together.

In fact, Jerry was a working partner with Maxie in the World Methodist Council.  At the 1991 World Conference in Nairobi, Kenya, Jerry envisioned each national church being asked to create in advance an artistic representation of their church in the year prior to coming to the ‘91 Conference.  In the words of Dr. Joe Hale, the late general secretary of the World Methodist Council, “The overall result was a spectacular array of color, coordinated style, and …an international artistry that was stunning.”  One day of the conference, these banners were carried “through the streets of the city in a great procession.”  Jerry’s wonderful vision of artistry has been a part of every world conference since.

Readers walk with Maxie through the incredible racial violence that existed in Mississippi in 1963.  While he was pastoring there, Medgar Evers was assassinated in Jackson.  The civil rights leader had been helping in James Meredith’s efforts to enroll in the University of Mississippi.  The whole nation was seething with emotion and anger.  Maxie was one of twenty-eight Methodist ministers in the Mississippi Annual Conference who gathered to present a statement.  “Born of Conviction,” to the church in Mississippi.  The statement shook Methodism to its foundations as it got wide media coverage in the state.

One feels the emotion as one of Maxie’s most active members, a doctor who had delivered both of their daughters, “stormed into my office, threw a copy of the Times-Picayune (a New Orleans newspaper) down on the desk and shouted, “What the hell is this?  I have never been so disappointed in my life!”  Maxie’s handling of this encounter is a beautiful example of how Christ was forming his mind and character in the early years of his ministry.

Maxie recalls that, “Within 18 months of the signing of the document, 18 of the 28 signers had left Mississippi, two left later, and only 8 continued their total ministry vocation in the state.” In June of 2013, on the 50th anniversary of Evers’ death, the Mississippi Annual Conference was meeting in Jackson.  The conference presented the The Emma Elzy Award, and award celebrating those who had contributed to the improvement of race relations in Mississippi, to “the 28 ministers.”  Eight of the 28 signers who were still living were present.  Maxie was invited and was there along with Keith Tonkel to    accept the award for “the 28.”  Maxie said in his acceptance remarks, “Fifty years ago some young men, now old men, signed a statement, and now this Annual Conference is saying, ‘We appreciate that.’ God outwits us.” (For a complete article about the statement and its impact, see “The Long Arc Toward Justice” by Steve Beard, Good News, July/August, 2013.)

Maxie is know and loved by Methodists around the world probably more than any living United Methodist leader.  They will be blessed and edified by his book.  Here is a pastor who has been effective in the local church, bold in addressing issues facing the nation, a visionary leader at the Upper Room, a prolific author, a seminary president, a voice for renewal (the Houston and Memphis Declarations, and a co-founder of the Confessing Movement), and a mentor to more pastors than we might imagine.

Maxie believes his most significant contribution to the cause of Christianity and the Christian Church was The Workbook of Living Prayer.  It was first published in 1974 and is still in print.  The publisher estimates that more than one million copies have been printed, and it is available in at least six different languages.  These numbers are utterly stunning! Maxie reports having received “thousands of letters from people who have used it” and many have testified “that their lives were transformed, and many others mark their commitment to full-time Christian ministry to the use of the workbook.”

This is a story that needed to be told.  It is a book that needs to be read.  For those who read it, they will find it far more rewarding than they might have imagined.

In the foreword to the book, the Rev. J.D. Walt, Seedbed’s Publisher, tells of having the task of introducing Maxie to a large group of folks gathered for a weekend of preaching and teaching.  He struggled as he stood before the group and asked, “How does one introduce a hero?”  With those words, he broke down and began to weep.  He could only motion for Maxie to come to the stage, and he sat down.  I think I understand.  Maxie has been a great Christian leader of our day, is a man of genuine humility, of Christlikeness, of impeccable integrity, of seasoned wisdom, and a leader grounded in biblical truth and prayer.  J.D., you are right.  He is worthy of being our “hero.”  May the Lord give us more like him.

From The Desk Of Pastor Stan

The past year has been one of the most enjoyable years of my 40 years of Ministry. Since becoming the Pastor here at Bethel Wesley, I have been blessed to shepherd some of the most wonderful people in Methodism. The warmth and acceptance has made it easy for me to adjust in so many ways. I thank all of you and I am constantly praying for each of you to grow spiritually and continue to be the loving and caring congregation that you are. <!–split–>

As we embark upon a new conference year, let’s all continue to support the programs, ministries and outreach efforts that Bethel Wesley is currently engaged in. I am excited to see which direction God is going to take us this year.

I’m reminded of the Apostle Paul’s letter of encouragement to the church at Philippi. Paul’s advice to his friends at Philippi, I believe, proves uniquely relevant for us today. Strange events are taking place in the world. A temptation exists for Christians to panic on one hand or go off on a tangent on the other hand. Some people even claim to have a key to future events and capitalize on their so-called knowledge by exploiting gullible people who follow them blindly. Yet, there are others who have become frustrated with the seeming hopelessness of the world and the condition that it is in. There are also those who have become emotionally incapable of normal Christian living and service.

What will wise Christians do? May I suggest that we follow Paul’s simple yet profound advice to the Christians at Philippi?  Whether God is about to wrap up history or not, we should serve him faithfully now. If God is ready to take us to heaven, we should be ready to go. If, however God wants us to continue to live in this perplexed world, we need to be steadfast, unmovable, always abounding in the work of the Lord. Why, of one thing we can be certain – our work, no matter how small it may seem, will not be useless nor fruitless if we are serving our Savior!